Men, trans/masculine, and non-binary people negotiating conception: Normative resistance and inventive pragmatism

Damien W. Riggs, Carla A. Pfeffer, Ruth Pearce, Sally Hines, Francis Ray White

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Growing numbers of men, trans/masculine, and non-binary people are undertaking pregnancies, yet relatively little is known about the experiences of this diverse population in regard to conception. Aims: This study sought to examine men’s, trans/masculine, and non-binary people’s experiences of pregnancy, including conception. Methods: Interviews were conducted with 51 men, trans/masculine, and non-binary people who were gestational parents living in Australia, Canada, the European Union (including the United Kingdom), and the United States. Thematic analysis was undertaken, focusing on accounts of conception. Pfeffer’s conceptual frameworks of normative resistance and inventive pragmatism were used as an analytic tool. Results: Themes developed focused on: 1) choosing a clinic donor, 2) kinship with donors, 3) conceiving via intercourse with a partner, 4) negotiating receipt of donor sperm, 5) challenges associated with known donors, 6) challenges associated with fertility clinics, and 7) experiences of conception. Discussion: The forms of normative resistance and inventive pragmatism identified suggest that men, trans/masculine, and non-binary people who are gestational parents seek to normalize their experiences of conception, while also acknowledging the specific challenges they face.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)6-17
Number of pages12
JournalInternational Journal of Transgender Health
Volume22
Issue number1-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020

Keywords

  • Conception
  • donor conception
  • men
  • non-binary
  • reproduction trans/masculine

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