Metastatic Carcinoma with Associated Lymphoadenopathy and Acquired Horner’s Syndrome Portrayed in a Third Century CE Roman Bust

Raffaella Bianucci, Casey Kirkpatrick, Francesco M Galassi, Antonio Perciaccante, Simon T Donell, Otto Appenzeller, Andreas G. Nerlich

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Over fve centuries Roman portraiture developed through stylistic cycles. Physical elements of both politicians and wealthy individuals were alternatively represented as extremely veristic (realisitic) or classising (idealising) [1, 2]. In the third century CE, the portraits of wealthy freedmen (liberti) rather than the patrician élite were characterised by an unusual realism [1, 2], and great care was applied to reproduce the physiognomy of the sitters, defects and pathologies included [3]. In several cases, the Roman funerary art included the busts of the deceased [3] and some of them are so detailed to show suggestive evidence of neurological conditions [4].
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)617-620
Number of pages4
JournalHead and Neck Pathology
Volume15
Issue number2
Early online date23 Nov 2020
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2021

Keywords

  • Metastic Cacinoma
  • Lymphoadenopathy
  • Acquired Horner's Syndrome

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