Mindfulness, self-compassion, anxiety and depression measures in South Australian yoga participants: implications for designing a yoga intervention

Nicole Snaith, Tim Schultz, Michael Proeve, Philippa Rasmussen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: The aim of the study was to examine the demographic and practice characteristics of current yoga participants and assess their levels of mindfulness, self-compassion, stress, anxiety, depression and wellbeing and implications for designing a yoga intervention.

Methods: A web-based survey was administered to South Australian yoga teachers and students from September 2014 to February 2015.

Results: Results showed a positive correlation with mindfulness and self-compassion and negative correlation with Depression, Anxiety and Stress scores with months of practice. Mindfulness and self-compassion scores were significantly higher with two or more classes per week and mindfulness higher in those with a regular meditation practice.

Discussion: Key findings indicate that class frequency, practice experience and meditation practice are important factors in designing a yoga intervention examining mindfulness and mental health.

Conclusion: Findings provide important information for guiding development of a yoga intervention for anxiety and depression.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)92-99
Number of pages8
JournalComplementary Therapies in Clinical Practice
Volume32
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Mental health
  • Mindfulness
  • Yoga

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