Missed nursing care, nurse staffing levels and patient safety outcomes in low-income country acute care settings: An observational study

Ashagre Molla Assaye, Richard Wiechula, Timothy J. Schultz, Rebecca Feo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims: The aim of this study was to measure the level of missed nursing care and determine its relationship with nurse staffing and patient safety outcomes in acute care settings in Ethiopia. Background: Missed nursing care in hospitals increases the likelihood of patient adverse events, complications, disability and death. However, little is known about the level of missed nursing care and its impact on patient outcomes in low-income countries. Methods: An observational study was conducted comprising of a survey of nurses at two time points (n = 74 and 80, respectively) and a medical record review of 517 patients in four units across two hospitals between September 2018 and March 2019. Results: The level of missed nursing care in the study units was very high. The hospital type and hours nurses worked during the last week were significantly associated with missed nursing care. A unit increase in missed nursing care score increased the incidence of adverse patient outcomes by 10%. Conclusion: There was a higher level of missed nursing care in the study units compared with similar studies from high-income countries. Higher level of missed nursing care was significantly associated with higher incidence of adverse patient safety outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere13031
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Journal of Nursing Practice
Volume28
Issue number1
Early online date30 Dec 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2022

Keywords

  • low- and middle-income countries
  • missed nursing care
  • nurse staffing
  • outcomes
  • patient safety
  • rationing nursing care

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