Mother's Infant and Young Child Feeding (IYCF) knowledge improved timely initiation of complementary feeding of children aged 6-24 months in the rural population of northwest Ethiopia

Gashaw Andargie Biks, Amare Tariku, Molla Mesele Wassie, Terefe Derso

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: Appropriate complementary feeding is vital to reduce young child morbidity and mortality. However, it continues as sub-optimal in Ethiopia, and literatures are also scarce. Therefore, this study aimed to determine timely initiation of complementary feeding and associated factors among mothers with children aged 6-24 months in the rural population of northwest Ethiopia. In the community based cross-sectional study, data on child feeding practices, individual and household characteristics were collected in Dabat Demographic Surveillance System site, Dabat District, northwest Ethiopia from 01 May to 29 June 2015. The bivariate and backward stepwise multivariable statistical methods were carried out to identify factors associated with timely initiation of complementary feeding. Results: About 53.8% [95% CI 45.9, 61.7] and 4.6% [95% CI 1.3, 7.9] of children were found with timely initiation of complementary feeding and had minimum dietary diversity, respectively. The odds of timely initiation of complementary feeding was higher among mothers with medium [AOR = 2.34, 95% CI 1.54, 3.81] and high [AOR = 2.10, 95% CI 1.41, 3.87] mother's IYCF knowledge. In Dabat district, complementary feeding practice is lower. Thus, efforts should be strengthened to boost mother's IYCF knowledge.

Original languageEnglish
Article number593
Number of pages7
JournalBMC Research Notes
Volume11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Complementary feeding
  • Dietary diversity
  • IYCF knowledge

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