"Mullin' the Yarndi" and Other Wicked Problems at a Multiracial Early Childhood Education Site in Regional Australia'

Barbara Kameniar, Alia Imtoual, Debra Bradley

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    6 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    In this article, Grint's model of leadership is used to shape discussions of how "problems" are responded to in the context of a preschool in an Australian regional town. Authority styles are described as command, management, or leadership. These authority styles result in approaching problems as "crises," "tame problems" or "wicked problems" and approaching racial difference in terms of computed"essentialism," "evasion," or "cognizance." This article engages with the approach to "wicked problems" by arguing that framing complex issues, such as race differences, as "wicked problems" allows for multiple ways of thinking through issues which are not possible if they are framed as "crises" or "tame problems." In this article, we examine a number of examples from the preschool of how "wicked problems" occur in daily practice.

    Original languageEnglish
    Article numberCurrent Contents search
    Pages (from-to)9-27
    Number of pages19
    JournalEducational Policy
    Volume24
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jan 2010

    Keywords

    • Aboriginal education
    • Leadership
    • Multiracial contexts
    • Wicked problems

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