Musculoskeletal pain is not associated with obstructive sleep apnoea or daytime sleepiness but is associated with poor sleep quality

J Li, Sarah Appleton, Tiffany Gill, Andrew Vakulin, Gary Wittert, Nicholas Antic, Anne Taylor, Robert Adams, C Hill

    Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting Abstract

    Abstract

    Aim: To examine the relationship between pain and objectively-determined
    obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) in a general population sample.
    Methods: Shoulder, back, hip, knee, hand, and foot pain were assessed by
    Computer-Assisted Telephone Interview were determined in a random
    sample (n = 368) of men aged 40+ years from the Men Androgen Inflam-
    mation Lifestyle Environment and Stress (MAILES) Study. OSA was deter-
    mined with full in-home unattended polysomnography (Embletta X100)
    scored by 2007 American Academy of Sleep Medicine (alternative) criteria.
    Daytime sleepiness and sleep quality were assessed by the Epworth Sleepi-
    ness Scale and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, respectively.
    Results: Presence of any joint pain was not associated with OSA
    (p = 0.223).There was also no association between pain in any specific joint
    (shoulder, back, hip, knee, hand or foot) with OSA; nor was the number of
    joints in pain associated with OSA. There was similarly no association
    between pain variables and daytime sleepiness, except for hand pain
    (adjusted odds ratio 2.88, 95% CI 1.49–5.55). However, musculoskeletal
    pain was associated with poor sleep quality: any joint pain (1.91, 95% CI
    1.06–3.45), shoulder pain (2.26, 95% CI 1.27–4.02), back pain (1.93–
    1.18–3.16), foot pain (2.39, 95% CI 1.33–4.28). The number of joints in
    pain was also associated with poor sleep quality (5–6 joints vs. no joints
    9.66, 95% CI 2.66–35.05).
    Conclusions: Consistent with previous reports, musculoskeletal pain was
    associated with poor sleep quality in this general population sample.
    However, there was no association between pain and OSA or between pain
    and daytime sleepiness.
    Original languageEnglish
    Article numberARA-P46
    Pages (from-to)22
    Number of pages1
    JournalInternal Medicine
    Volume44
    Issue numberS2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2014
    EventAustralian Rheumatology Association in conjunction with the Rheumatology Health Professionals Association 55th Annual Scientific Meeting - Hobart, Australia
    Duration: 17 May 201420 May 2014

    Keywords

    • obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA)
    • pain
    • sleep quality

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