Must every child with long QT syndrome take a beta blocker?

Kathryn E. Waddell-Smith, Nikki Earle, Jonathan R. Skinner

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Long QT syndrome is the most commonly recognised cause of sudden cardiac death in children. With a prevalence of 1 in 2000, family screening is identifying large numbers of hitherto asymptomatic gene carriers in the community, about a third of whom have a normal QT interval. The mainstay of treatment is long term uninterrupted beta blocker therapy, a treatment with many potential side effects. This article reviews the evidence and suggests a cohort who may, after assessment in a specialised cardiac-genetic clinic, be spared this treatment because of very low baseline risk. These are asymptomatic boys and prepubertal girls with a heart rate corrected QT interval persistently less than 470 ms who do not indulge in high risk activities (especially swimming) and do not have a missense mutation in the c-loop region of the KCNQ1 (long QT 1) gene.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)279-282
Number of pages4
JournalArchives of Disease in Childhood
Volume100
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Long QT syndrome
  • sudden cardiac death
  • beta blocker therapy

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Must every child with long QT syndrome take a beta blocker?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this