Natural resource management implications of the pre-european non-volant mammal fauna of the southern tip of eyre peninsula, South Australia

Matthew McDowell, Graham Medlin

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    9 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Sinkholes and coastal caves located in, around and between the Coffin Bay and Lincoln National Parks were surveyed for pre-European fossils, which were collected from or just below the sediment surface. Twenty-four pre-European fossil samples, including eight already in the collections of the South Australian Museum, were analysed and 25 native and five introduced species of non-volant mammal were identified. Native and introduced species were often found together, indicating that the sites have accumulated mammal remains in both pre- and post-European times. Only four of the non-volant native mammals recovered are known to be extant in the study area today: Lasiorhinus latifrons, Macropus fuliginosus, Cercartetus concinnus and Rattus fuscipes. In contrast, 20 native species recorded have been extirpated and one (Potorous platyops) is now extinct. C. concinnus was recorded from only one of the fossil assemblages but is known to be widespread in the study area today. This may indicate recent vegetation change related to European land management practices and have implications for natural resource management in the area.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)87-93
    Number of pages7
    JournalAustralian Mammalogy
    Volume32
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2010

    Keywords

    • Holocene fossil
    • mammal decline
    • subfossil

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