Negative workplace behaviour: temporal associations with cardiovascular outcomes and psychological health problems in Australian police

Michelle Tuckey, Maureen Dollard, Judith Saebel, Narelle Berry

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    23 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Negative workplace behaviour, such as workplace bullying, is emerging as an important work-related psychosocial hazard with the potential to contribute to employee ill health. We examined the risk of two major health issues (poor mental and cardiovascular health) associated with current and past exposure to negative behaviour in the workplace. Data from 251 police officers, who completed an anonymous mail survey at two time-points spaced 12 months apart, support the potential role of exposure to negative workplace behaviour in the development of physical disease and psychological illness. Specifically, we saw significant effects associated with past exposure to such behaviour on indicators of poor cardiovascular health, and a significant effect of current exposure on the indicator of mental health problems. Our findings reinforce the need to continue to study links between employee health and both negative workplace behaviour and more severe cases of bullying, particularly the mechanisms involved to strengthen theory in this area, and to protect against employee ill health (specifically cardiovascular outcomes and psychological problems) by preventing negative behaviour at work.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)372-381
    Number of pages10
    JournalStress and Health
    Volume26
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Dec 2010

    Keywords

    • cardiovascular disease
    • mental illness
    • negative workplace behaviour
    • occupational stress
    • police
    • psychosocial hazards
    • workplace bullying

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