Nerve growth factor treatment does not prevent dorsal root ganglion cell death induced by target removal in chick embryos

Charles Straznicky, Robert A. Rush

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    7 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    In chick embryos, on the 3rd day of incubation, the developing right wing bud was removed. One group of the operated embryos was treated with a daily dose of 20 μg purified nerve growth factor (NGF) from the 5th day of incubation and sacrificed on the 12th day. The other group was sacrificed on the 12th day of incubation and served as control. NGF was also administered to intact, unoperated embryos for comparison. The size of the dorsal root ganglia in segments 13-16 innervating the wings, were estimated and the number of surviving dorsal root ganglion cells counted both on the right (operated) and left (intact) sides. Although NGF brought about an increase in the size of the ganglia and an increase in the number of dorsal root ganglion cells bilaterally, it was not able to prevent excessive cell death of dorsal root ganglion cells on the operated side. The number of surviving neurons in the dorsal root ganglia on the operated side in embryos with or without NGF administration was only about 30-50% of the number of the intact side. These results show that cell death induced by target removal cannot be offset by NGF administration. It is concluded that NGF may act as a growth promoting agent for developing sensory neurons but other peripheral trophic factor/s are also needed for the maintenance and survival of dorsal root ganglion cells.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)357-363
    Number of pages7
    JournalAnatomy and Embryology
    Volume171
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Apr 1985

    Keywords

    • Chick embryo
    • Dorsal root ganglion cells
    • Neuronal death
    • NGF
    • Trophic factor/s

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Nerve growth factor treatment does not prevent dorsal root ganglion cell death induced by target removal in chick embryos'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this