Noradrenergic transmission in isolated guinea-pig intestine following in vivo administration of antibodies to dopamine β-hydroxylase

J. B. Furness, M. Costa, R. A. Rush, L. B. Geffen

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    The effectiveness of transmission from noradrenergic nerves supplying the guinea-pig ileum was evaluated in normal preparations and in preparations taken from animals injected 18 h to 4 days previously with antiserum to dopamine β-hydroxylase. Degeneration of the nerves following the antiserum was monitored histochemically in the same preparations. A decline in the effectiveness of transmission, which paralleled the degeneration of the nerves, was observed. The earliest effects were detected at 18 h and the greatest effect was found at 2-4 days following the administration of antiserum. Binding of the antibodies has been detected as early as 6 h after injection. It is therefore concluded that binding of the antibodies to the nerves, per se, does not significantly compromise transmission, and that histochemical evidence of degeneration can be used to indicate the onset of functional deterioration of noradrenergic nerves following their exposure to antobodies to dopamine β-hydroxylase.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)203-209
    Number of pages7
    JournalAustralian Journal of Experimental Biology and Medical Science
    Volume57
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 1979

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