Obstetric and psychosocial risk factors for Australian-born and non-Australian born women and associated pregnancy and birth outcomes: A population based cohort study

Hannah Dahlen, Bryanne Barnett, Jane Kohlkoff, Ana Munoz, Charlene Thornton

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    10 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Background: One in four Australians is born overseas and 47 % are either born overseas or have a parent who was. Obstetric and psychosocial risk factors for these women may differ. Method: Data from one Sydney hospital (2012-2013) of all births recorded in the ObstetriX™ database were analysed (n = 3,092). Demographics, obstetric and psychosocial risk profile, obstetric interventions and complications and selected maternal and neonatal outcomes were examined for women born in Australia and overseas. Results: Women born in Australia were younger, more likely to be primiparous (28.6 v 27.5 %), be obese (32.0 % v 21.4 %), smoke (19.7 % v 3.0 %), have an epidural (26.2 % v 20.2 %) and were less likely to have gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) (6.8 % v 13.7 % when compared to non-Australian born women. The highest rates of GDM, Gestational Hypertension (GH) and maternal anaemia were seen in women born in China, the Philippines and Pakistan respectively. Differences were also seen in psychosocial screening between Australian and non-Australian women with Australian-born women more likely to smoke and report a mental health disorder. There was an association between having an Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) ≥ 13 and other psychosocial issues, such as thoughts of self-harm, domestic violence, childhood abuse etc. These women were also less likely to breastfeed. Women with an EPDS ≥ 13 at booking compared to women with EPDS ≤12 had a higher chance of being diagnosed with GDM (AOR 1.85 95 % CI 1.14-3.0). Conclusions: There are significant differences in obstetric and psychosocial risk profiles and maternal and neonatal outcomes between Australian-born and non-Australian born women. In particular there appears to be an association between an EPDS of ≥13 and developing GDM, which warrants further investigation.

    Original languageEnglish
    Article number292
    Pages (from-to)Art: 292
    Number of pages7
    JournalBMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
    Volume15
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2015

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