Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) and Excessive Daytime Sleepiness (EDS) are Independently Associated with Depression in a Community Based Population of Australian Men

Carol J Lang, Sarah L Appleton, Andrew Vakulin, Doug R McEvoy, Gary A Wittert, S A Martin, J F Grant, Anne W Taylor, Nicholas A Antic, Peter Catcheside, Robert Adams

    Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting Abstract

    Abstract

    Rationale:longitudinal analyses we examined the hypotheses that EDS and previously diagnosed and undiagnosed OSA are associated withdepression prevalence and incidence in a population-based cohort of community dwelling Australian men. Depression was assessed using Beck’s Depression Inventory (BDI)/Centre for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D)Methods:in 1875 men aged 35-83 years at two time points approximately 5 years apart. A random sample of men without previously diagnosedOSA (n = 857) undertook at home polysomnography (PSG) and completed the Epworth Sleepiness Scale questionnaire. 1660 men withoutdepression at baseline were included in the longitudinal analysis of incident depression. Previously undiagnosed severe OSA (adjusted OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.07-3.70) was associated with depression prevalence in theResults:cross-sectional analyses even after adjustment for confounders and EDS. EDS (adjusted OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.40-3.95) was also associated withdepression. Men with previously undiagnosed OSA and EDS had 4.2 times greater odds of depression than subjects without OSA and EDSand 3.5 times greater odds of depression than individuals with either OSA or EDS alone. Both previously diagnosed OSA (OR 2.0, 95% CI1.15-3.45) and previously undiagnosed severe OSA (AHI ≥ 30) (OR 2.9, 95% CI 1.19-6.92)) at follow-up were significantly associated withdepression onset over a 5 year period. Other PSG parameters including O saturation, O desaturation and arousal index were not22associated with depression prevalence or incidence. Severe OSA and EDS are independently associated with depression prevalence and onset in men. Clinicians should recogniseConclusion:the risk of OSA in men recently diagnosed with depression, particularly if sleepiness is present.
    Original languageEnglish
    Article numberA3934
    Number of pages1
    JournalAmerican Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
    Volume191
    Issue numberC19
    Publication statusPublished - May 2015
    EventAmerican Thoracic Society 2015 International Conference - COLORADO CONVENTION CENTER, Denver, United States
    Duration: 15 May 201520 May 2015

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