Obtrusive Intimacy in Multi-Owned Housing: Exploring the Impacts on Residents’ Health and Wellbeing

Moira Walsh, Kathy Arthurson, Iris Levin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In Australia, densification trends and affordability issues have led to increased numbers of people living in high-density multi-owned forms of housing. These housing forms are characterized by close living arrangements, necessitating co-operation with and consideration for neighbours. In the absence of cooperation and consideration, strained relations/disputes among tenants are common, having the potential to result in a range of negative consequences for individual health and wellbeing. While most current research has focused on large-scale developments, little attention has been given to issues arising from smaller-scale multi-owned housing. Through 26 in-depth interviews with residents in smaller multi-owned housing in Adelaide and Melbourne, and drawing on the concept of obtrusive intimacy, this article explores the issue of noise in small multi-owned housing and its impacts on privacy, neighbour relations, and health and wellbeing.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)614-630
Number of pages17
JournalHousing, Theory and Society
Volume38
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021

Keywords

  • health and wellbeing
  • Multi-owned housing
  • noise
  • obtrusive intimacy
  • privacy
  • strata

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