On geoscientisation: A response to Cupples

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

Abstract

Cupples' (2020) provocative paper explores the processes and practices of “geoscientisation,” focusing on its material consequences and the forms of “epistemic erasure” (p. 4) it yields. Her paper is a stimulating contribution that brings to the surface a range of issues that have swirled quietly and sometimes angrily around corridors and staff meetings for years. While there is certainly very much more to discuss I wish to make three main points in this necessarily brief response. First, I argue that the process of geoscientisation is not quite as “top‐down” as Cupples describes and suggest that the concept needs to better acknowledge its diverse driving forces. Second, I submit that “geoscientisation” of the discipline—and to some extent a “scientisation” of the social sciences—may be more pervasive than Cupples declares. Third, I think Cupples comes up short on strategies for resisting geoscientisation.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)14-17
Number of pages4
JournalNew Zealand Geographer
Volume76
Issue number1
Early online date1 Jan 2020
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2020

Keywords

  • GEOSCIENCE - "Geoscientisation”
  • Epistemic erasure
  • Correspondence

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