On the ground insights from disability professionals supporting people with intellectual disability who have experienced sexual violence

Ellen Frances Fraser-Barbour

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is report on a study exploring the views of service providers, both within disability service sectors and in mainstream violence response sectors, about ways of effectively supporting people with intellectual disability who may be experiencing abuse and violence. Design/methodology/approach: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with seven participants and analysed both thematically and in more depth from a socio-ecological perspective. Findings: Participants highlighted five key factors facilitating or hindering professionals working with individuals with intellectual disability who may be experiencing abuse and violence: connecting clients with services and establishing a rapport; access to information about histories of trauma; policy context; inaccessibility and unavailability of mainstream violence response services; client understanding of what happens “next” after identification of harm. Originality/value: Overall the study indicates a strong need for the development of resources, information and tools designed to educate and enhance the understanding of professionals supporting people with ID and to better facilitate learning and understanding for people with ID regarding what happens “after” disclosure of sexual violence or other experiences of harm.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)207-220
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Adult Protection
Volume20
Issue number5-6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 23 Nov 2018

Keywords

  • Disability sector
  • Learning/intellectual disabilities
  • Safeguarding
  • Service provision
  • Sexual abuse
  • Supportive responses
  • Trauma-informed

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