On the importance of the commemoration of the Centenary in Australia

Research output: Other contribution

Abstract

In the collective Australian imagination, Australia was born as a nation on 25 April 1915 on the beaches of Gallipoli during the landing of the ANZAC (Australian and New Zealand Army Corps) in the Dardanelles1. It was not so much the 60,000 years of Aboriginal presence or the start of the colonisation by the British in 1788 or even the federation of the States in 1901 which symbolise the founding of the nation state but really the fighting alongside the troops of King George V, as part of the invasion of a distant land – The Ottoman Empire – which was an ally of Germany during the Great War.
Original languageEnglish
TypeContribution to First World War Centenary Partnership Program website
Media of outputText
PublisherFirst World War Centenary Partnership Program
Number of pages7
Place of PublicationFrance
Publication statusPublished - 29 May 2013
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Australia
  • Commemorations
  • WWI
  • First World War
  • ANZAC (Australian and New Zealand Army Corps)
  • Remembrance
  • Gallipoli

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