Open-minded and reflective thinking predicts reasoning and meta-reasoning: evidence from a ratio-bias conflict task

Henry W. Strudwicke, Glen E. Bodner, Paul Williamson, Michelle M. Arnold

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Dispositional measures of actively open-minded thinking and cognitive reflection both predict reasoning accuracy on conflict problems. Here we investigated their relative impact on meta-reasoning. To this end, we measured reasoning accuracy and two indices of meta-reasoning performance–conflict detection sensitivity and meta-reasoning discrimination–using a ratio-bias task. Our key predictors were actively open-minded thinking and cognitive reflection, and numeracy, cognitive ability, and mindware instantiation were controlled for. Actively open-minded thinking was a better predictor of reasoning accuracy and meta-reasoning discrimination than cognitive reflection, and was the only dispositional measure to significantly predict conflict detection sensitivity. Thus, susceptibility to biased reasoning and meta-reasoning may be better captured by a reasoner’s ability to engage in open-minded thinking than by their ability to engage in reflective thinking.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages27
JournalThinking and Reasoning
Early online date22 Sept 2023
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 22 Sept 2023

Keywords

  • bias susceptibility
  • individual differences
  • Meta-reasoning
  • thinking dispositions

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