Optimization of transcranial direct current stimulation of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex for tinnitus: A non-linear dose-response effect

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Abstract

Neuromodulation is defined as the process of augmenting neuroplasticity via invasive or non-invasive methods. Tinnitus is the perception of sound in the absence of its external source. The objective of this study was to optimize the parameters of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) for tinnitus suppression. The following factors were optimized in the dose-response design (n = 111): current intensity (1.5 mA or 2 mA), stimulation duration (20 min or 30 min), and number of stimulation sessions (2, 4, 6, 8, or 10), with a 3-4 day washout period between each session. Participants underwent a minimum of 2 sessions in 1 week or maximum of 10 sessions in 5 weeks' time. Tinnitus loudness was measured in pre-post design using a 10-point numeric rating scale. There was a significant reduction in tinnitus loudness after tDCS of DLPFC. There was no significant difference between the intensity and duration of stimulation. As the number of sessions increased, there was a higher reduction in the tinnitus loudness; however, this effect plateaued after 6 sessions.

Original languageEnglish
Article number8311
Number of pages8
JournalScientific Reports
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 29 May 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Medical research
  • Neurology
  • Neuromodulation
  • Tinnitus

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