Optimizing Cognitive Training for the Treatment of Cognitive Dysfunction in Parkinson’s Disease: Current Limitations and Future Directions

Bianca Guglietti, David Hobbs, Lyndsey Collins-Praino

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
6 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Cognitive dysfunction, primarily involving impairments in executive function, visuospatial function and memory, is one of the most common non-motor symptoms of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Currently, the only pharmacological treatments available for the treatment of cognitive dysfunction in PD provide variable benefit, making the search for potential non-pharmacological therapies to improve cognitive function of significant interest. One such therapeutic strategy may be cognitive training (CT), which involves the repetition of standardized tasks with the aim of improving specific aspects of cognition. Several studies have examined the effects of CT in individuals with PD and have shown benefits in a variety of cognitive domains, but the widespread use of CT in these individuals may be limited by motor impairments and other concerns in study design. Here, we discuss the current state of the literature on the use of CT for PD and propose recommendations for future implementation. We also explore the potential use of more recent integrative, adaptive and assistive technologies, such as virtual reality, which may optimize the delivery of CT in PD.
Original languageEnglish
Article number709484
Number of pages26
JournalFrontiers in Aging Neuroscience
Volume13
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 13 Oct 2021

Keywords

  • dementia
  • mild cognitive impairment
  • Neurorehabilitation
  • serious games
  • Multimodal factors
  • prevent
  • non-pharmaceutical
  • serious game
  • multimodal
  • neurorehabilitaiton

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Optimizing Cognitive Training for the Treatment of Cognitive Dysfunction in Parkinson’s Disease: Current Limitations and Future Directions'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this