Overt Attention and Predictiveness in Human Contingency Learning

Mike E. Le Pelley, Tom Beesley, Oren Dennis Griffiths

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

60 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Two experiments used eye-tracking procedures to investigate the relationship between attention and associative learning in human participants. These experiments found greater overt attention to cues experienced as predictive of the outcomes with which they were paired, than to cues experienced as nonpredictive. Moreover, this attentional bias persisted into a second training phase when all cues were equally predictive of the outcomes with which they were paired, and it was accompanied by a related bias in the rate of learning about these cues. These findings are consistent with the attentional model of associative learning proposed by Mackintosh (1975), but not with that proposed by Pearce and Hall (1980).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)220-229
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of experimental psychology: animal behavior processes
Volume37
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

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