Oxyhaemoglobin saturation following elective abdominal surgery in patients receiving continuous intravenous infusion or intramuscular morphine analgesia

M. T. Kluger, H. Owen, D. Watson, A. H. Ilsley, A. M. Baldwin, R. R.L. Fronsko, J. L. Plummer, W. G. Brose

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Oxygen saturation was continuously measured using computerised pulse oximetry for 8 h overnight pre‐operatively and for the first 24 h postoperatively in 40 patients receiving intermittent intramuscular morphine or continuous infusion of morphine following elective upper abdominal surgery. The proportion of time with an oxygen saturation less than 94% was used as an index of de'saturation. Patients receiving continuous infusion analgesia received a larger morphine dose and achieved better analgesia than the intramuscular group. Postoperatively, the duration of desaturation increased 10‐fold over pre‐operative values, ‘intramuscular’ patients spending 39.0% (SD, 37.0%) and ‘continuous infusion’ patients 40.0% (SD, 37.5%) of the time below 94% saturation. Although newer therapies (e.g. epidural analgesia and patient‐controlled analgesia) are currently receiving greater attention, the sequelae of these more traditional analgesic techniques warrant further study.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)256-260
Number of pages5
JournalAnaesthesia
Volume47
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 1992
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Analgesics
  • Complications
  • hypoxia
  • Monitoring
  • morphine
  • oximetry
  • Pain
  • postoperative

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Oxyhaemoglobin saturation following elective abdominal surgery in patients receiving continuous intravenous infusion or intramuscular morphine analgesia'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this