Pandemics and Social Cohesion: 1918-1920 Influenza Pandemic and the Reduction in US Suicide Rates

Tarun Bastiampillai, Stephen Allison, Jonathan Brailey, Mandy Ma, Sherry Kit Wa, Jeffrey C.L. Looi

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

Abstract

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic may increase US suicide rates due to the combined impact of high COVID-19–related mortality, acute recession, income shock, bankruptcy, decline in asset values, loss of savings, rising unemployment, job stress and insecurity, social isolation, barriers to accessing treatment, increased population distress and anxiety, and increased alcohol misuse.1,2 There is some suggestion that previous epidemics may have increased suicide rates in Hong Kong (severe acute respiratory syndrome epidemic) and in the United States (influenza pandemic: 1918–1920).3,4
Original languageEnglish
Article number20com02882
JournalThe Primary Care Companion for CNS Disorders
Volume23
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 29 Apr 2021

Keywords

  • coronavirus disease
  • suicide
  • pandemic

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