Parent- and child-reported parenting: Associations with child weight-related outcomes

Amanda Taylor, Carlene Wilson, Amy Slater, Philip Mohr

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    60 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The present study aimed to investigate associations of both parent-reported and child-perceived parenting styles and parent-reported parenting practices with child weight and weight-related behaviours. Participants were 175 children (56% female) aged between 7 and 11, and their primary caregivers (91% female), recruited through South Australian primary schools. Children completed measures of parenting style, attitude toward fruit, vegetables, and non-core food, and attraction to physical activity. Parents completed measures of parenting style and domain-specific parenting practices (feeding and activity-related practices) and reported on child dietary intake, physical activity, and sedentary behaviour. Objective height and weight measurements were taken from children, from which body mass index (BMI) was calculated. Child-reported parenting style and parent-reported parenting practices were uniquely associated with child weight-related outcomes, but styles and practices did not interact in their association with child outcomes. Child-reported parenting style was associated with child food and activity attitudes, whereas parent-reported parenting style was not associated with child outcomes. The findings of the present study generally support the recommendation of a parenting style high in demandingness and responsiveness for supporting healthy child weight-related behaviours, along with appropriate domain-specific practices. The child's perspective should be incorporated into research involving child outcomes wherever possible.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)700-706
    Number of pages7
    JournalAppetite
    Volume57
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Dec 2011

    Keywords

    • Child activity
    • Child dietary intake
    • Parenting
    • Pediatric obesity

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