Parenting and the behavior problems of young children with an intellectual disability: Concurrent and longitudinal relationships in a population-based study

Vasiliki Totsika, Richard Patrick Hastings, Dimitrios Vagenas, Eric Emerson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We examined parenting behaviors, and their association with concurrent and later child behavior problems. Children with an intellectual disability (ID) were identified from a UK birth cohort (N = 516 at age 5). Compared to parents of children without an ID, parents of children with an ID used discipline less frequently, but reported a more negative relationship with their child. Among children with an ID, discipline, and home atmosphere had no long-term association with behavior problems, whereas relationship quality did: closer relationships were associated with fewer concurrent and later child behavior problems. Increased parent-child conflict was associated with greater concurrent and later behavior problems. Parenting programs in ID could target parent-child relationship quality as a potential mediator of behavioral improvements in children.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)422-435
JournalAmerican Journal on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Volume119
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Intellectual disability
  • Longitudinal
  • Parent-child relationship
  • Parenting

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