Parents’ Non-Standard Work Schedules Make Adequate Childrearing Difficult: Reforming Labor Market Practices Can Improve Children’s Cognitive and Behavioral Outcomes

Leila Morsy, Richard Rothstein

Research output: Book/ReportCommissioned report

Abstract

Recent developments in employment practices have increased the prevalence of non-standard work schedules—non-daytime shifts in which most hours do not fall between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m., when shifts rotate, or when schedules vary weekly or otherwise. For example, computer software now enables retail, restaurant, service, and other firms to predict hourly customer demand and delivery schedules with precision, encouraging employers to create “just-in-time” schedules in which workers are called in or sent home on short notice.1 By preventing many parents from adequately caring for their children, such practices adversely affect child and adolescent development.

This issue brief examines evidence on the prevalence of unpredictable and non-standard work schedules, and on how such schedules impair children’s development. It concludes by proposing policy solutions.
Original languageEnglish
Place of PublicationWashington, DC
PublisherEconomic Policy Institute
Number of pages6
Publication statusPublished - 6 Aug 2015

Keywords

  • shift work
  • family caregivers
  • child development
  • “just-in-time” schedules

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Parents’ Non-Standard Work Schedules Make Adequate Childrearing Difficult: Reforming Labor Market Practices Can Improve Children’s Cognitive and Behavioral Outcomes'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this