Patterns of decline in numbers of learning disability nurses employed by the English National Health Service

Gyles Glover, Eric Emerson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose - To report on trends in the number of learning disability nurses working in the English National Health Service (NHS). Design/methodology/ approach - The paper provides secondary analysis of data from NHS workforce statistics. Findings - Over the period 2008 to 2011, there was a decline of 23 per cent in the number of whole time equivalent learning disability nurses employed by the NHS. While the decline may, in part, be explained by a parallel reduction in NHS inpatient beds for people with learning disabilities, unevenly distributed reductions in the number of community nurses in different English regions are harder to explain. Research limitations/implications - A better understanding of the numbers of learning disability nurses working in different sectors, given the roles expected of them, is essential to workforce planning and training plans. Originality/value - Learning disability nurses are crucial to modern community based learning disability services. In this context, the number and distribution of them is important.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)194-198
Number of pages5
JournalTizard Learning Disability Review
Volume17
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Learning disabilities
  • Learning disability nursing
  • Nurses
  • Social care
  • Workforce planning

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