Peer victimization and its relationship to depression among Australian primary school students

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173 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Victimization is increasingly being recognized around the world as a psychologically harmful, physically damaging and socially isolating aspect of the school life of a small but significant group of children. The principal aim of the present study was to examine the relationship between three dimensions of children's peer relations, namely the tendency to be victimized, to bully and to be prosocial and depression. Questionnaires were administered to 353 primary school students assessing various dimensions of peer relations and depression. As predicted the tendency to be victimized was found to be significantly associated with depression. Interestingly there was also a significant association between depression and the tendency to bully. The findings highlight the need for early identification of, and intervention with, children at risk for peer relations problems.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)57-62
Number of pages6
JournalPersonality and Individual Differences
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 1995

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