Perceptions of intergenerational inequality in policymaking and possible responses: The case of Australia

Veronica Coram

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Abstract

Evidence suggests that, on average, younger citizens in advanced industrial democracies tend to have different policy preferences to those aged 65 and over. Population ageing and relatively lower levels of electoral participation among young people amplify the political voice of older citizens and contribute to policymakers being more responsive to their preferences. This paper presents qualitative evidence on whether young adults and older Australians recognise a need to increase young people’s influence on policymaking in the context of intergenerational inequality. The paper considers possible responses to this need, such as voting age reform. Results indicate that there is reasonable support, including from the older participants, to enhance young people’s political voice and influence over policymaking. Growing awareness of intergenerational inequality in ageing democracies may make public opinion more favourable towards voting age reform and other measures to increase the political voice of young people.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)515-525
Number of pages10
JournalYouth
Volume2
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2022

Keywords

  • intergenerational inequality
  • youth participation
  • ageing population
  • electoral participation
  • policy influence
  • policy attitudes

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