Perspectives on limiting tobacco access and supporting access to nicotine vaping products among clients of residential drug and alcohol treatment services in Australia

Joshua Trigg, Jane Rich, Edwina Williams, Coral Gartner, Ashleigh Guillaumier, Billie Bonevski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: Tobacco endgame strategies aim to drive down population smoking rates, the success of which can be improved with public buy-in, including from populations with high smoking rates such as alcohol and other drug (AOD) service clients. This study aimed to explore acceptability of tobacco retail and nicotine reduction, and subsidised nicotine vaping to support AOD service clients following a smoking cessation attempt.

Methods: We interviewed 31 Australian AOD service clients who currently or previously smoked, following a 12-week randomised trial comparing nicotine replacement therapy with nicotine vaping product (NVP) for smoking cessation. Participants were asked how effectively three scenarios would support tobacco cessation: tobacco retailer reduction, very low-nicotine cigarette standard and subsidised NVP access. We thematically analysed participant views on how each approach would support tobacco abstinence.

Results: Tobacco retailer reduction raised concerns about increasing travel and accessing cigarettes from alternate sources, with generally lower acceptability, though a range of perspectives were provided. Reducing nicotine in tobacco products was described as reducing appeal of smoking and potentially increasing illicit purchases of non-reduced nicotine products. Clients of AOD services were highly accepting of subsidised NVP access for tobacco cessation, as this would partly address financial and socioeconomic barriers.

Conclusions: Australian tobacco control policy should consider how these approaches impact ease and likelihood of tobacco access by AOD service clients in relation to the general population. Understanding clients’ acceptability of tobacco control and endgame measures can inform how to avoid potential unintended consequences for these clients.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages7
JournalTobacco control
Early online date11 Oct 2023
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 11 Oct 2023

Keywords

  • Addiction
  • Cessation
  • Electronic nicotine delivery devices
  • End game
  • Priority/special populations

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Perspectives on limiting tobacco access and supporting access to nicotine vaping products among clients of residential drug and alcohol treatment services in Australia'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this