Posterior segment findings by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography and clinical associations in active toxoplasmic retinochoroiditis

Genevieve F. Oliver, Lisia Barros Ferreira, Barbara R. Vieira, Sigrid Arruda, Michelle Araújo, Jillian M. Carr, Justine R. Smith, João M. Furtado

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Toxoplasmic retinochoroiditis is a common, potentially blinding parasitic infection. We sought to define the spectrum and frequency of signs of active toxoplasmic retinochoroiditis by spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), and to identify clinical associations. Ninety eyes of 90 individuals presenting consecutively to a tertiary referral uveitis service with active toxoplasmic retinochoroiditis and gradable SD-OCT scans were evaluated prospectively. SD-OCT features were collated, and associations with lesion location, primary versus recurrent episode, serological status, human immunodeficiency virus infection and best-corrected Snellen visual acuity were explored. Active toxoplasmic retinochoroiditis presented with thickened (65%) and hyperreflective (61%) retina, choroidal thickening (55%) and hyporeflectivity (61%), hyperreflective vitreous dots (80%) and deposits (36%), and posterior hyaloid thickening (35%) on SD-OCT. Most signs occurred with similar frequency across clinical groups. Retinal hyporeflectivity (17%) was significantly associated with a visual acuity of 20/200 or worse at resolution. Our observations demonstrate that active toxoplasmic retinochoroiditis has diverse SD-OCT signs and that none are universally present. Retinal hyporeflectivity—suggesting liquefactive necrosis—predicts poor visual outcome.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1156
Number of pages10
JournalScientific Reports
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 21 Jan 2022

Keywords

  • Eye diseases
  • Retinal diseases

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