Practices for inclusion, structures of marginalisation: experiences of refugee background students in Australian secondary schools

Emily Miller, Tahereh Ziaian, Helena de Anstiss, Melanie Baak

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The number of people forcibly displaced from their homes globally is at an all-time high, with some granted permanent residence and resettlement in countries like Australia. Students from refugee backgrounds attend Australian schools and how schools respond to their educational needs is increasingly a focus for research, school practice and policy making. We present analysis of qualitative data from a study in South Australia with refugee background students (n = 23), their parents/caregivers (n = 19) and educators (n = 22) in high school settings during 2017–2019. The study investigated inclusive practices in schools and their effects on student experiences. The findings suggest that larger social systems impact students and their families in resettlement. Bronfenbrenner’s ecological systems theory is utilised to analyse the multiple ways in which social systems act and how schools are structured to offer inclusive practice. Practice that attends to the influences of social systems can support a sense of belonging and engagement with schooling, and ultimately contribute to positive settlement outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1063-1084
Number of pages22
JournalAustralian Educational Researcher
Volume49
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2022
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Culturally and linguistically diverse
  • Inclusive education
  • Multicultural
  • Refugee

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