Pre-emptive, early, and delayed alendronate treatment in a rat model of knee osteoarthritis: effect on subchondral trabecular bone microarchitecture and cartilage degradation of the tibia, bone/cartilage turnover, and joint discomfort

Geetha Mohan, Egon Perilli, Ian Parkinson, Julia Humphries, Nick Fazzalari, Julia Kuliwaba

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    Abstract

    Objective: Bisphosphonates are considered potential disease modifying osteoarthritis (OA) agents. The present study investigated the efficacy of pre-emptive, early, and delayed alendronate (ALN) treatment initiation on subchondral trabecular bone and cartilage in low-dose monosodium iodoacetate (MIA)-induced knee OAin rats. Methods: Male rats received pre-emptive (n=12, day 0-end of week 2), early (n=12, end of week 2-end of week 6), or delayed (n=12, end of week 6-end of week 10) ALN treatment (30μg/kg/week). Pre-emptive ALN-treated rats were scanned using invivo micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) after 2 weeks and then sacrificed, early ALN-treated rats were scanned after 2 and 6 weeks and sacrificed, and the delayed ALN-treated rats were scanned after 2, 6, and 10 weeks of OA induction and sacrificed. After sacrifice, bone histomorphometry and histology of the tibia and biomarker analyses were undertaken. Changes in hind limb weight-bearing were assessed from day-1 until day 14. Results: MIA-induced pathological features similar to progressive human OA in the cartilage and subchondral bone. Pre-emptive ALN treatment preserved subchondral trabecular bone microarchitecture, prevented bone loss, decreased bone turnover and joint discomfort. Pre-emptive ALN treatment had moderate effects on cartilage degradation. Early and delayed ALN treatments prevented loss of trabeculae and decreased bone turnover, but had no significant effect on cartilage degradation. Conclusion: ALN prevented increased bone turnover and preserved the structural integrity of subchondral bone in experimental OA. The time point of treatment initiation is crucial for treating OA. Treating both the subchondral bone and cartilage in OA would be clinically more beneficial.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1595-1604
    Number of pages10
    JournalOsteoarthritis and Cartilage
    Volume21
    Issue number10
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2013

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