Predictors of Health-Care Workers’ Unwillingness to Continue Working During the Peak of COVID-19 in Western Ethiopia: An Extended Parallel-Process Model Study

Ashenafi Habte Woyessa, Adugna Oluma, Thanasekaran Palanichamy, Birtukan Kebede, Eba Abdissa, Busha Gamachu Labata, Tamirat Alemu, Lamessa Assefa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)
2 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Purpose: Willingness to work in disasters is context-specific and corresponds to the nature, magnitude, and threats posed by a particular public health emergency. None us is certain that our health professionals will continue to provide service should the COVID-19 pandemic crisis climb to its worst level. It was with this uncertainty in mind that this study was done to assess predictors of the unwillingness of health-care workers (HCWs) to continue providing their professional services during the climax of the COVID-19 crisis. Methods: This was a facility-based descriptive cross-sectional study undertaken among 633 HCWsin western Ethiopia. Results: Overall, 205 (32.4%) providers said that they would be unwilling to continue work if COVID-19 peaked. Of these, 176 (27.9%) respondents reported that they would stop going in to work before they were at greatest risk. Statistical analysis performed to predict HCWs unwillingness’ to continue work at peak COVID-19 showed male sex (AOR 11.4, 95% CI 8.32-12.6), younger age (AOR 25.3, 95% CI 4.61-40.67), lack of experience in handling similar pandemics (AOR 5.15, 95% CI 1.1-255), and low perceived level of hospital preparedness (AOR 2.05, 95% CI 0.80-5.21) were predictors of unwillingness. In accordance with the extended parallel-process model, higher threat perception (P≤0.001) and low efficacy perception (P≤0.040) were associated with unwillingness of the HCWs to continue working. Conclusion: The proportion of HCWs unwilling to continue their job during COVID-19 is sufficient to affect efforts tof fight the pandemic. As the question of whether our HCWs must risk themselves to treat COVID-19 patients does not have a uniform answer, working on predictors of potential unwillingness is of paramount importance.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1165—1173
Number of pages9
JournalRisk Management and Healthcare Policy
Volume14
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 17 Mar 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • COVID-19
  • Health-care workers
  • Pandemic
  • Unwillingness

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