Predictors of outcome after elective endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair and external validation of a risk prediction model

Brendan Wisniowski, Mary B. Barnes, Jason S. Jenkins, Nicholas S. Boyne, Allan J. Kruger, Philip J. Walker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair (EVAR) has been associated with lower operative mortality and morbidity than open surgery but comparable long-term mortality and higher delayed complication and reintervention rates. Attention has therefore been directed to identifying preoperative and operative variables that influence outcomes after EVAR. Risk-prediction models, such as the EVAR Risk Assessment (ERA) model, have also been developed to help surgeons plan EVAR procedures. The aims of this study were (1) to describe outcomes of elective EVAR at the Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital (RBWH), (2) to identify preoperative and operative variables predictive of outcomes after EVAR, and (3) to externally validate the ERA model. Methods: All elective EVAR procedures at the RBWH before July 1, 2009, were reviewed. Descriptive analyses were performed to determine the outcomes. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify preoperative and operative variables predictive of outcomes after EVAR. Binomial logistic regression analyses were used to externally validate the ERA model. Results: Before July 1, 2009, 197 patients (172 men), who were a mean age of 72.8 years, underwent elective EVAR at the RBWH. Operative mortality was 1.0%. Survival was 81.1% at 3 years and 63.2% at 5 years. Multivariate analysis showed predictors of survival were age (P =.0126), American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score (P =.0180), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (P =.0348) at 3 years and age (P =.0103), ASA score (P =.0006), renal failure (P =.0048), and serum creatinine (P =.0022) at 5 years. Aortic branch vessel score was predictive of initial (30-day) type II endoleak (P =.0015). AAA tortuosity was predictive of midterm type I endoleak (P =.0251). Female sex was associated with lower rates of initial clinical success (P =.0406). The ERA model fitted RBWH data well for early death (C statistic =.906), 3-year survival (C statistic =.735), 5-year survival (C statistic =.800), and initial type I endoleak (C statistic =.850). Conclusions: The outcomes of elective EVAR at the RBWH are broadly consistent with those of a nationwide Australian audit and recent randomized trials. Age and ASA score are independent predictors of midterm survival after elective EVAR. The ERA model predicts mortality-related outcomes and initial type I endoleak well for RBWH elective EVAR patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)644-653
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Vascular Surgery
Volume54
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2011
Externally publishedYes

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