Preference for Situations Involving Effort, Time Pressure, and Feedback in Relation to Type A Behavior, Locus of Control, and Test Anxiety

N. T. Feather, R. E. Volkmer

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    22 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Eighty subjects from an introductory psychology course rated the desirability of eight course structures that differed according to all combinations of the presence or absence of effort required for success, time pressure, and the provision of feedback. Subjects also completed questionnaire measures of the Type A behavior pattern, test anxiety, and external locus of control. Results showed that the Type A behavior pattern was negatively related to external locus of control and that externals tended to have higher test anxiety scores than internals. Multiple regression analyses that involved the personality variables and age and gender showed that the Type A variable predicted preference for course structures that involved effort and feedback and that external control predicted preference for course structures that were independent of effort and provided little feedback. Test anxiety and desirability ratings were positively correlated for the course structure that was not dependent on effort, had little time pressure, and had little feedback. The results were consistent with the view that individuals seek out and prefer situations that are consistent with their personality characteristics.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)266-271
    Number of pages6
    JournalJournal of Personality and Social Psychology
    Volume55
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1988

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