Preventing lifestyle-related disease among recently arrived immigrants by partnering with English language providers to improve cancer literacy

C. Wilson, D. Hughes

    Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

    3 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Migrants, particularly those who leave developing and third world countries with the aim of settling in first world, western nations migrate after higher exposure to communicable diseases and generally lower risk of morbidity and mortality from non‐communicable diseases, including cancer and cardiovascular disease, than the residents of their new home. This has been described as the “healthy migrant effect.” The effect is documented in many first world regions including the UK (Kennedy, Kidd, McDonald, & Biddle, 2015), the US (Hamilton, 2015) and Australia (Biddle, Kennedy, & McDonald, 2007) and includes risk for cancers linked to lifestyle behaviour. It is attributed to both a selection bias that precludes “unhealthy” applicants from gaining entry or from seeking to relocate and a different profile of lifestyle choices among many migrants that can initially protect them from risk for chronic disease.
    Original languageEnglish
    Article numbere12659
    Number of pages4
    JournalEuropean Journal of Cancer Care
    Volume26
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jan 2017

    Keywords

    • migrants
    • lifestyle
    • chronic diseases
    • Western countries
    • health literacy
    • Cancer Incidence

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