Primipaternity and birth interval; independent risk factors for preeclampsia

A. Hercus, G. Dekker, S. Leemaqz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The exact cause of preeclampsia remains unknown. The past decade has seen an ongoing debate on the relative importance of primipaternity versus prolonged birth/pregnancy interval. Aims: The aim of the current study was to analyze these two major potential risk factors in a high risk population in the Northern suburbs of Adelaide; a socioeconomically disadvantaged area characterized by instable relationships and overall poor health and lifestyle. Methods: A retrospective cohort study was performed on all multigravid women birthing at the Lyell McEwin Hospital, Adelaide, from July 2011 to August 2012; 2003 patients were included in this analysis. Basic demographic data, previous pregnancy outcomes, paternity, and birth and pregnancy intervals were recorded. Results: Women with a previously normal pregnancy had a significantly increased risk of developing preeclampsia in subsequent pregnancy with a new paternity (OR: 2.27 [p =.015]). Increasing birth and pregnancy intervals were associated with a significantly increased risk of developing preeclampsia in later pregnancies, with OR 1.39 at 3 years (p =.042) and OR 2.05 at 4 years (p =.002). Conclusions: The results of this study indicate that both prolonged birth interval and primipaternity are independent risk factors for preeclampsia in multigravidae.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)303-306
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine
Volume33
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Birth interval
  • new paternity
  • preeclampsia
  • pregnancy interval
  • primipaternity

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