Processing speed and mental retardation: Deadline procedures indicate fixed and adjustable limitations

Neil Brewer, Glen A. Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Brewer and Smith (1984) showed that control mechanisms mediating speed-accuracy regulation contribute to retarded-nonretarded differences in processing speed, with poorly controlled trial-to-trial RT adjustments underlying the greater RT variability of retarded individuals. In Experiment 1, response deadlines controlled processing time, thus minimizing the influence of such control mechanisms. The obtained speed-accuracy relations showed that retarded subjects were unable to match nonretarded subjects' accuracy when responding as rapidly, thus indicating structural limitations on processing speed. The results of Experiment 2 showed, however, that significant adjustments to retarded subjects' processing speed-exceeding those produced by practice-are achievable. Extended training at a short deadline led to tighter control of RT adjustments, with substantial improvements in mean RT when subjects transferred to a self paced RT task.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)443-450
Number of pages8
JournalMemory & Cognition
Volume18
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 1990
Externally publishedYes

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