Production can enhance semantic encoding: Evidence from forced-choice recognition with homophone versus synonym lures

Jonathan M. Fawcett, Glen E. Bodner, Borys Paulewicz, Julia Rose, Rachelle Wakeham-Lewis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The production effect—better memory for words read aloud rather than silently—has been attributed to responses at test being guided by memory for the act of production. In Experiment 1, we evaluated this distinctiveness account by comparing production effects in forced-choice recognition when lures were either homophones of the targets (toad or towed?) or unrelated words (toad or seam?). If the production effect at test was driven solely by memory for the productive act (e.g., articulation, auditory processing), then the effect should be reduced with homophone lures. Contrary to that prediction, the production effect did not differ credibly between homophone-lure and unrelated-lure groups. Experiment 1 led us to hypothesize that production may also boost semantic encoding, and that participants use memory of semantic encoding to guide their forced-choice responses. Consistent with these hypotheses, using synonym lures to interfere with semantic-based decisions (poison or venom?) reduced the production effect relative to using unrelated lures (poison or ethics?) in Experiment 2. Our findings suggest that enhanced conceptual encoding may be another useful product of production.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2256-2263
Number of pages8
JournalPsychonomic Bulletin and Review
Volume29
Issue number6
Early online date11 Jul 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2022

Keywords

  • Distinctiveness
  • Forced-choice recognition
  • Production effect

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