Professional socialisation and professional fit: Theoretical approaches to address student learning and teaching in speech-language pathology

Stacie Attrill, Rachel Davenport, Chris Brebner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: The sociocultural and historical context and membership of the speech-language pathology (SLP) profession underpins our norms of practice and our discourses. This context also informs and defines the ways that we practice today, including who we legitimise to enter our profession and why. In this paper, we used theory as a tool to critically explore how this socioculturally constituted knowledge and practice influences how students experience learning in SLP practice placements. Method: We used the theory of Legitimate Peripheral Participation (1991) as a conceptual framework to interpret qualitative data from two separate programs of research that had explored the phenomena of student learning in SLP practice placements. Result: The analysis cast light on how our understanding and expectations of SLP students’ learning and competency development in placements is recursive and strongly legitimised in our profession. Students adjust to accommodate the professional knowledges, practices and expectations they encounter in their placements. This facilitates the perpetuation of practices proffered by the majority culture. Conclusion: The use of theory allowed us to explore the phenomena of student learning in placements in a new light, which unmasked new understandings of the longstanding challenge to increase diversity in the SLP community.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages12
JournalInternational Journal of Speech-Language Pathology
Early online date19 Dec 2021
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 19 Dec 2021

Keywords

  • diversity
  • legitimate peripheral participation
  • practice placements
  • socialisation
  • speech-language pathology
  • students

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