Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial of Video- Versus Recall-Assisted Reflection in Simulation-Based Teaching on Acquisition and Retention of Airway Skills Among Trainees Intubating Critically Ill Patients

Shivesh Prakash, Shailesh Bihari, Russell Laver, Giresh Chandran, Lachlan Kerr, Lambert Schuwirth, Andrew Bersten

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Conventionally, simulation-based teaching involves reflection on recalled events (recall-assisted reflection). Instead of recall, video-assisted reflection may reduce recall bias and improve skills retention by contributing to visual memory. Here, we test the hypothesis that when compared with recall, video-assisted reflection results in higher acquisition and retention of skills involved in airway management among junior critical care doctors. DESIGN: Randomized control trial. Participants were randomized 1:1 to video-assisted reflection or recall-assisted reflection group. SETTING: University-affiliated tertiary care center. SUBJECTS: Junior critical care doctors. INTERVENTION: Video-assisted reflection. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: All participants underwent simulation-based teaching of technical and nontechnical airway skills involved in managing a critically ill patient. These skills were assessed before, post-workshop, and in the following fourth week, by two independent blinded assessors using a validated scoring tool. Quality of debrief was assessed using a validated questionnaire. Repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to assess time and group interaction. Forty doctors were randomized. At baseline, the groups had similar airway experience (p = 0.34) and skill scores (p = 0.97). There was a significant interaction between study groups and changes over time for total skill scores (F[2, 37] = 4.06; p = 0.02). Although both the study groups had similar and significant improvement in total skills scores at the postworkshop assessment, the decline in total skills scores at delayed assessment (F[1, 38] = 5.64; p = 0.02) was significantly more in the recall-assisted reflection group when compared with the video-assisted reflection group. This resulted in lower mean skill scores in the recall-assisted reflection group when compared with the video-assisted reflection group in the delayed assessment (89.45 [19.32] vs 110.10 [19.54]; p < 0.01). Better retention was predominantly in the nontechnical skills. The perceived quality of debrief was similar between the two groups. CONCLUSION: When compared with recall, video-assisted reflection resulted in similar improvement in airway skills, but better retention over time.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1265-1270
Number of pages6
JournalCritical care medicine
Volume48
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2020

Keywords

  • airway management
  • simulation training
  • teaching
  • feedback
  • video recording
  • psychology
  • retention

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial of Video- Versus Recall-Assisted Reflection in Simulation-Based Teaching on Acquisition and Retention of Airway Skills Among Trainees Intubating Critically Ill Patients'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this