Protein, lipid and energy requirements of cultured marine fish in cold, temperate and warm water

Jenna Bowyer, Jianguang Qin, David Stone

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    31 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Temperature is one of the most important physical factors influencing fish growth. Under optimal temperatures, food energy partitioned into fish growth can be maximized. However, when a marine carnivorous species is cultured in an environment where temperature falls outside the optimal range of a fish, growth will be affected. The nutrient-environment interaction is important for optimizing a fish's nutritional requirements throughout the grow-out period. The most current global issue for the aquaculture industry is the inclusion of alternative ingredients into formulated diets to produce a sustainable seafood product. This requires the substitution of fish meal and fish oil with alternative ingredients from plant and terrestrial animal sources. This review discusses the changes in nutritional requirements (protein, lipid and energy) and physiology of some commonly cultured marine fishes as a consequence of seasonal changes in temperature during the grow-out period. This review also discusses the effects of replacing fish meal and fish oil with alternative protein and lipid sources on the nutritional-environmental interactions of fish performance at different temperatures.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)10-32
    Number of pages23
    JournalReviews in Aquaculture
    Volume5
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2013

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