Psychological maturity of at-risk juveniles, young adults and adults: implications for the justice system

Claire Bryan-Hancock, Sharon Casey

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    7 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Research Centre for Injury Studies, Flinders University, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia While the justice system assumes adulthood is reached by the age of 18 and given the increase in the number of juveniles being tried within adult court, it is imperative to understand whether young people are as criminally culpable for their actions as adults and where differences may lie in the maturity of young people and their adult counterparts. Psychological maturity was assessed in order to gain a better understanding of culpability and responsibility in at-risk young people, 18-year-olds and 25- year-olds to determine where psychosocial maturity levels and the propensity to make antisocial decisions differ and, if so, how. At-risk young people and 18-year-olds differed from 25-year-olds in psychological maturity levels, instigating implications for future research and the trial of young people as adults.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)57-69
    Number of pages13
    JournalPsychiatry, Psychology and Law
    Volume17
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Feb 2010

    Keywords

    • Adolescence
    • Culpability
    • Maturity
    • Psychology and law

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