Pulmonary effects of chronic elevation in microvascular pressure differ between hypertension and myocardial infarct induced heart failure

Dani Dixon, Kim Griggs, Carmine De Pasquale, Andrew Bersten

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    4 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Background: Chronic heart failure (CHF) following coronary artery ligation and myocardial infarction in the rat leads to a homeostatic reduction in surface tension with associated alveolar type II cell hyperplasia and increased surfactant content, which functionally compensates for pulmonary collagen deposition and increased tissue stiffness. To differentiate the effects on lung remodelling of the sudden rise in pulmonary microvascular pressure (Pmv) with myocardial infarction from its consequent chronic elevation, we examined a hypertensive model of CHF. Methods: Cardiopulmonary outcomes due to chronic pulmonary capillary hypertension were assessed at six and 15 weeks following abdominal aortic banding (AAB) in the rat. Results: At six weeks post-surgery, despite significantly elevated left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, myocardial hypertrophy and increased left ventricular internal circumference in AAB rats compared with sham operated controls (p. ≤. 0.003), lung weights and tissue composition remained unchanged, and lung compliance was normal. At 15 weeks post-surgery increased lung oedema was evident in AAB rats (p. =. 0.002) without decreased lung compliance or evidence of tissue remodelling. Conclusion: Despite chronically elevated Pmv, comparable to that resulting from past myocardial infarction (LVEDP. >. 19. mmHg), there is no evidence of pulmonary remodelling in the AAB model of CHF.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)158-164
    Number of pages7
    JournalHeart, Lung and Circulation
    Volume24
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2015

    Keywords

    • Abdominal aortic banding
    • Lung mechanics
    • Pulmonary oedema
    • Pulmonary remodelling
    • Rat

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