Quality of life of people who inject drugs: characteristics and comparisons with other population samples

Jane Fischer, Sue Conrad, Alexandra Clavarino, Robert Kemp, J Najman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To assess the quality of life (QOL) of persons who inject drugs. Methods: Some 483 current injecting drug users visiting a large NSP over a 2-week period in October 2009 were interviewed using a structured questionnaire. QOL was measured using the WHOQOL-BREF. Data were collected on age, gender, injecting patterns, current drug treatment status and hepatitis C status. Participant QOL profiles were compared to published domain scores for a range of other population groups. Results: People who inject drugs (PWID) experience a very poor QOL irrespective of socio-demographic characteristics, injecting patterns, hepatitis C sero-status and drug treatment status. Sample participants (PWID) experience a QOL below that experienced by many population groups in the community affected by disabling chronic illnesses. Conclusions: Injecting drug use is associated with a poor QOL. Some PWID may be self-medicating for chronic non-malignant pain, and it is likely that these people had a low QOL prior to the decision to inject. Despite this caveat, it remains likely that injecting drug use does little to enhance the QOL of the user.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2113-2121
Number of pages9
JournalQuality of Life Research
Volume22
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2013

Keywords

  • Needle and syringe programme
  • People who inject drugs
  • Quality of life

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