Quantification of Interplaying Relationships Between Wellbeing Priorities of Aboriginal People in Remote Australia

Rosalie Schultz, Stephen J. Quinn, Tammy Abbott, Sheree Cairney, Jessica Yamaguchi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Wellbeing is a useful indicator of social progress because its subjectivity accounts for diverse aspirations. The Interplay Research Project developed a wellbeing framework for Aboriginal Peoples in remote Australia comprising government and community wellbeing priorities. This article describes statistical modelling of community priorities based on surveys administered by community researchers to 841 participants from four remote settlements. Constructs for Aboriginal language literacy, cultural practice, and empowerment were identified through exploratory factor analysis (EFA); structural equation modelling (SEM) was used to confirm relationships. Cultural practice was associated with Aboriginal language literacy and empowerment, which were both associated with wellbeing. Aboriginal literacy and empowerment mediated negative direct relationships between cultural practice and wellbeing. Direct relationships were significant only for females for whom empowerment and Aboriginal literacy appear key to enhancing wellbeing.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages25
JournalInternational Indigenous Policy Journal
Volume10
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 25 Jun 2019

Keywords

  • Culture
  • Empowerment
  • Gender
  • Indigenous languages
  • Indigenous literacy
  • Wellbeing

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