Rationale and development of a manualised dietetic intervention for adults undergoing psychological treatment for an eating disorder

Caitlin M. McMaster, Tracey Wade, Christopher Basten, Janet Franklin, Jessica Ross, Susan Hart

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Due to the current dearth of literature regarding dietetic treatment for patients with an eating disorder (ED), no manualised dietetic interventions exist to enable the testing of dietetic treatments in this population. This paper aims to: (1) describe the rationale and development of a manualised dietetic intervention for adults undergoing concurrent psychological treatment for an ED; and (2) provide an overview of the feasibility testing of this intervention. Methods: Current best evidence to date for dietetic treatment in EDs was utilised to develop a manualised dietetic intervention for feasibility testing alongside outpatient psychological ‘treatment as usual’. Results: The developed intervention consists of five, dietitian-delivered outpatient sessions: (1) getting started; (2) mechanical eating and dietary rules; (3) estimating portion sizes and social eating; (4) maximising your meal plan and meal preparation; and (5) review and treatment planning as well as pre- and post-intervention assessments. Conclusion: This paper is intended as a resource for clinicians and researchers in the conduct of future studies examining dietetic treatment for patients with an ED. Level of evidence: Level V, description of a new manualised, reproducible dietetic intervention.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1467-1481
Number of pages15
JournalEating and Weight Disorders
Volume26
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 19 Jul 2020

Keywords

  • Adult
  • Dietetics
  • Evidence-based practice
  • Feeding and eating disorders
  • Nutrition therapy

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