Rationale, design and methods for a randomised and controlled trial of the impact of virtual reality games on motor competence, physical activity, and mental health in children with developmental coordination disorder

Leon Straker, Amity Cree Campbell, Lynn M. Jensen, Deborah R. Metcalf, Anne Julia Smith, Rebecca Anne Abbott, Clare M. Pollock, Jan P. Piek

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A healthy start to life requires adequate motor development and physical activity participation. Currently 5-15% of children have impaired motor development without any obvious disorder. These children are at greater risk of obesity, musculoskeletal disorders, low social confidence and poor mental health. Traditional electronic game use may impact on motor development and physical activity creating a vicious cycle. However new virtual reality (VR) game interfaces may provide motor experiences that enhance motor development and lead to an increase in motor coordination and better physical activity and mental health outcomes. VR games are beginning to be used for rehabilitation, however there is no reported trial of the impact of these games on motor coordination in children with developmental coordination disorder.
Original languageEnglish
Article number654
JournalBMC Public Health
Volume11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

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